One of the great obsessions of brands is to go viral. They all want their content to be viral and they all ask their social media and communication managers to ‘make them go viral’. The viral has become a kind of almost mandatory element, an element everyone dreamed of, since it helps to reach large masses of consumers and allows you to connect with a much higher number of potential customers. In addition, it achieves reach figures and quotas that go far beyond what brands could achieve organically.

However, in Buy Email Database & Build Email List Quickly all this obsession with going viral, a few things are lost from sight, things, on the other hand, crucial when it comes to establishing how virals are built and how brands manage to become protagonists of them.

Companies take it for granted that to be viral you just have to want it and forget that it is a complex process
One of the main problems and one of the main failures made by brands is to think that going viral is something overwhelmingly easy, as demonstrated, on the other hand, by the fact that everyone seems to be asking without further ado a viral.

Companies take it for granted that to be viral, they just have to want it and forget that it is a complex, complicated and long process, one in which brands have to work a lot if they want to achieve it. Although it is true that some viral content has achieved this characteristic by chance, the truth is that the process is much more difficult and complex than that and to win the crown of the viral is much more difficult than simply making it feel like it.

But that’s not the only problem. In this obsession to go viral and to make their content go viral, companies have crossed ‘to the other side’ and have indulged in a kind of guerrilla war in which it seems that practically anything goes if it is done. achieve success, the much desired viral.

As one of those viral producers explains to Digiday (one who, of course, has wished to remain anonymous) “risks and bad arts” are still very much present in the race to go viral, no matter how much scenarios like Facebook have advised that they will penalize some of those bad arts, such as clickbait.

One of the great obsessions of brands is to go viral. They all want their content to be viral and they all ask their social media and communication managers to ‘make them go viral’. The viral has become a kind of almost mandatory element, an element everyone dreamed of, since it helps to reach large masses of consumers and allows you to connect with a much higher number of potential customers. In addition, it achieves reach figures and quotas that go far beyond what brands could achieve organically.

However, in all this obsession with going viral, a few things are lost from sight, things, on the other hand, crucial when it comes to establishing how virals are built and how brands manage to become protagonists of them.

Companies take it for granted that to be viral you just have to want it and forget that it is a complex process
One of the main problems and one of the main failures made by brands is to think that going viral is something overwhelmingly easy, as demonstrated, on the other hand, by the fact that everyone seems to be asking without further ado a viral.

Companies take it for granted that to be viral, they just have to want it and forget that it is a complex, complicated and long process, one in which brands have to work a lot if they want to achieve it. Although it is true that some viral content has achieved this characteristic by chance, the truth is that the process is much more difficult and complex than that and to win the crown of the viral is much more difficult than simply making it feel like it.

But that’s not the only problem. In this obsession to go viral and to make their content go viral, companies have crossed ‘to the other side’ and have indulged in a kind of guerrilla war in which it seems that practically anything goes if it is done. achieve success, the much desired viral.

As one of those viral producers explains to Digiday (one who, of course, has wished to remain anonymous) “risks and bad arts” are still very much present in the race to go viral, no matter how many scenarios like Facebook have advised that they will penalize some of those bad arts, such as clickbait.

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