In general, when we talk about innovation in a company (whatever its nature), it is usually driven by supply. It is built from the conception of the business and from the knowledge of the market, and resources are oriented to develop improvements that can be continuous if they are based on what already exists, or discontinuous (disruptive) if they involve a radical change with respect to what is already known.

The latter have the advantage of breaking the imposed rules and providing the Austria Phone Number List organization with a new scenario where the offer finds little or no competition, which is an important advantage to position itself differentially with respect to the former. But what is not usually broken are the prevailing paradigms, the same needs are covered but in a different way.

In order to break paradigms, in addition to imagination and courage, it is essential that innovation be driven from demand, assuming the organization as a whole that this strategy should be the rule, not the exception.

When C. Christensen speaks of disruptive innovation, he refers to the technologies that bring to the market a value proposition different from any other previously available and that respond to needs that had not been raised until then. But those that propose radically different solutions to the same problems or needs are also disruptive.

This concept, transferred to marketing, has to transcend into the business model and positioning strategy. It is not enough to reformulate the variables of product, price, communication, distribution, processes, etc., jointly or individually for one or more of them, but it affects the way in which the company deals with the relationship with its customers and how manages your employees.

It is quite common to accept that one of the functions of marketing is to create new needs in consumers and then offer products or services that satisfy them, but the needs belong to a fairly reduced catalog (remember A. Maslow) supported by a series of well-defined physiological and psychological deficiencies in humans. Needs not yet manifested may be discovered, but not created. In this, marketing has to be more forward-looking than creative.

From the lateral thinking of Kotler &

In general, when we talk about innovation in a company (whatever its nature), it is usually driven by supply. It is built from the conception of the business and from the knowledge of the market, and resources are oriented to develop improvements that can be continuous if they are based on what already exists, or discontinuous (disruptive) if they involve a radical change with respect to what is already known.

The latter have the advantage of breaking the imposed rules and providing the organization with a new scenario where the offer finds little or no competition, which is an important advantage to position itself differentially with respect to the former. But what is not usually broken are the prevailing paradigms, the same needs are covered but in a different way.

In order to break paradigms, in addition to imagination and courage, it is essential that innovation be driven from demand, assuming the organization as a whole that this strategy should be the rule, not the exception.

When C. Christensen speaks of disruptive innovation, he refers to the technologies that bring to the market a value proposition different from any other previously available and that respond to needs that had not been raised until then. But those that propose radically different solutions to the same problems or needs are also disruptive.

This concept, transferred to marketing, has to transcend into the business model and positioning strategy. It is not enough to reformulate the variables of product, price, communication, distribution, processes, etc., jointly or individually for one or more of them, but it affects the way in which the company deals with the relationship with its customers and how manages your employees.

It is quite common to accept that one of the functions of marketing is to create new needs in consumers and then offer products or services that satisfy them, but the needs belong to a fairly reduced catalog (remember A. Maslow) supported by a series of well-defined physiological and psychological deficiencies in humans. Needs not yet manifested may be discovered, but not created. In this, marketing has to be more forward-looking than creative.

From the lateral thinking of Kotler & Tr

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